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The Worldly Winds: Being with Uncertainty

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The Worldly Winds: Being with Uncertainty

Join us for a practice weekend that will explore the Worldly Winds and a deepening exploration of uncertainty and instability.

As dh.Vishvapani notes:
“Everything that happens to us is impermanent. Things always change. However hard we work to establish favourable conditions, many things in our lives are entirely beyond our control and they change all the time in ways we cannot possibly predict or influence. That’s why our lives can never be perfect.”

(The Worldly Winds and Wisdom, Posted by Vishvapani on Mon, 10 October, 2011, The Buddhist Centre).
We will have periods of meditation in addition to supported body postures. Please wear loose, comfortable cloths.
Lunch will be served.

Open to all

Lead by Alyssa

 

We try to make these days as affordable as possible so you pay depending on your means
Sunday $50 or $65 or $75

>>> Book Now

This Buddhist monk’s plea may change the way you think and feel about animals.

Matthieu Ricard’s ‘A Plea For The Animals’ Is A Must Read:
A Wonderful Celebration Of World Animal Day 2016

From the huffingtonpost.com

Marc Bekoff
Professor emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder; homepage: marcbekoff.com

A celebration of World Animal Day 2016: “It is too late to be pessimistic”

Animals are “in.” There is incredible global interest in the cognitive, emotional, and moral lives of animals and in how we choose to interact with them in a wide variety of venues.
When I previously read the manuscript for Matthieu Ricard’s latest book called ‘A Plea for the Animals: The Moral, Philosophical, and Evolutionary Imperative to Treat All Beings with Compassion’ I simply couldn’t put it down (please see Note 1 for a brief biographical sketch). And, now that I have the published book in hand, I still can’t put it down. When I have time I can’t wait to pick it up again.

‘A plea for the Animals is a gem. Ever single page has many words of wisdom and the overall message is one of unfettered optimism. It is a wonderful way to celebrate World Animal Day 2016.

“Every cow just wants to be happy. Every chicken just wants to be free. Every bear, dog, or mouse experiences sorrow and feels pain as intensely as any of us humans do.”

The description for ‘A Plea for the Animals reads:

A powerful and wide-ranging indictment of the treatment of animals by humans ― and an eloquent plea for animal rights.

Every cow just wants to be happy. Every chicken just wants to be free. Every bear, dog, or mouse experiences sorrow and feels pain as intensely as any of us humans do. In a compelling appeal to reason and human kindness, Matthieu Ricard here takes the arguments from his best-sellers Altruism and Happiness to their logical conclusion: that compassion toward all beings, including our fellow animals, is a moral obligation and the direction toward which any enlightened society must aspire. He chronicles the appalling sufferings of the animals we eat, wear, and use for adornment or “entertainment,” and submits every traditional justification for their exploitation to scientific evidence and moral scrutiny. What arises is an unambiguous and powerful ethical imperative for treating all of the animals with whom we share this planet with respect and compassion.matthieu-ricard

Read more in the Huffingtonpost

New York Today: How to Meditate on Your Commute

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It doesn’t have to be so stressful. Credit Ángel Franco/The New York Times

 

Updated, 8:00 a.m.

Good morning on this flawless Friday.

As subways become increasingly overcrowded and delayed, we’re guessing that your daily commute is becoming a more stressful affair.

Well, dear reader, we wish you a peaceful and pleasurable trip to work this morning however you’re arriving, and here’s something that might help you achieve that: meditation.

According to research, meditation can help ease mental tension, and it might also improve sleep, fight depressionand illness, and reduce lower back pain.

A straightforward and accessible technique is mindfulness meditation, said David Gelles, a reporter at The Times who recently wrote a guide to meditation.

Full article New York Times

What is depression? – Helen M. Farrell


Depression is the leading cause of disability in the world; in the United States, close to ten percent of adults struggle with the disease. But because it’s a mental illness, it can be a lot harder to understand than, say, high cholesterol. Helen M. Farrell examines the symptoms and treatments of depression, and gives some tips for how you might help a friend who is suffering.

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

Danceitation

Meanwhile in the UK

“Danceitation is borderline revolutionary. It is a rebuke to anyone who thinks dancing is synonymous with tequila, or that meditation means incense and harem pants.”
– Indigo Memoirs, London

“Better than a year of psychoanalysis, a bottle of prozac and a flask of whiskey!”
– N, New York

http://www.danceitation.com

Sangha at the Lucid Body House

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On Friday, October 9, long-time Triratna NYC sangha member Fay Simpson held the inaugural Performance Salon at her recently renovated Lucid Body House in the Kip’s Bay neighborhood of Manhattan. An impressive coterie of artists, performers, and students made for a full house at what Fay hopes will become an ongoing, monthly event.

Fay performed in a dance piece she created, entitled, “Sharla’s Story”. Other sangha members joined her on stage. Josh Heath presented a selection of his paintings from a series called “The Apostles”, while Brian Waldbillig read from his original work, “On Compassion of the Tree”. The New York sangha had notable contingent in attendance: in addition to the performers, Sita Mani, Lara Nahas, Vajramati, and Brian’s dog Dante all showed up to offer support and encouragement.

To find out more about Fay’s work and to check out future events, go to www.lucidbody.com

Buddhism and Meditation Class Monday October 5th

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Start Dates: 2015
October 5thFour Mondays 7–9pmMeditation and The Six Perfections

Each course is four weeks long, each week starts with a short talk about some aspect of meditation followed by a talk on some  the topic for that month.
The class runs from 7pm to 9 pm.

TO REGISTER:
 Pay in Advance $80
 Pay on the first night $100

Notes:
With all of the activities, you are free to participate or to just sit and listen – nothing is compulsory.
If you cannot afford the course cost please let us know, and we will make arrangements for you to join us.

 

 

 

Nepal

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Karuna Trust

Following news of the devastating earthquake in Nepal, there is an urgency to respond to the immediate needs of survivors and to support long term recovery efforts.

Nepal has been devastated by an earthquake which struck the capital city, Kathmandu, and surrounding areas on Saturday. More than 5,000 people have been killed and around 8 million people have been affected by the devastation.

There has been widespread damage in the Kathmandu valley and the death toll is climbing rapidly. Many vulnerable people have been left homeless without adequate shelter, food and water. All donations to this fund will support disaster recovery and relief efforts for the earthquake in Nepal.

Karuna’s partner organisation in Nepal runs mother and child health work in the district of Pharphing. The district has been very seriously affected. Half of the houses there have been destroyed and as access to the area is still restricted we are as yet unaware of the total number of fatalities. What we do know is that there will be people who need our help now and in the coming months.

www.karuna.org

Green Tara Trust

NEPAL EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE

A powerful earthquake has hit Nepal. Green Tara Trust is there. The good news is that our are staff are safe. The bad news is that our programme area has been decimated. We are trying to get through. There will be people who need our help, mothers delivering babies and children without food or shelter. They need our help now & in the coming months.

www.greentaratrust.com

The Mindfulness of Dog

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Dante in front of the shrine

Four of us from the New York sangha spent this past weekend upstate, in rural (and currently rather snowy) Columbia County. By four of us, I mean four of us human beings. There were also three dogs among us: little Mona, medium-sized Dante, and bigger Inu. The ride up was surprisingly tranquil, despite all seven mammals being carefully wedged into a not-so-spacious hybrid car. The dogs seemed to get on famously, having decided to overlook whatever nuttiness it was on the part of their human companions that had brought everyone together in such a small space for a two-hour-plus drive.

We decided on the drive up that we’d meditate together in the mornings. We were all going to do so anyway, so it made sense to make an impromptu shrine area somewhere in the house and sit together.

An aside. The small dog, Mona, is mine. She’s a pug, and she’s over fourteen years old. If you know pugs, you know that they make a not-insubstantial amount of snorting noises. The older Mona has gotten, the more impressive her wet, smacking, slurping, snorting repertoire has become. I’ve meditated with her at my side many times. I certainly don’t set it up that way, but very often I sit to meditate, and at some point she gets bored and comes looking for me. Clip-clip-clip down the hallway I hear her nails, and then comes the symphony of mouth and nose noises, with an occasional spray on my arm. Without fail, she decides that my sit is over before the timer has, so she starts to mewl, or paw my arm. Not paying attention to Mona is simply not an option.

I call her the Sixth Hindrance.

So you can imagine that I was a bit apprehensive about exposing my friends to all of this while they meditated. She didn’t disappoint, but she was hardly alone. From all three dogs there were a lot of licking sounds, licking of paws, of undercarriages, of the floor, of our arms… There was a lot of restless movement, at first at least. There was slapping of tails against us as the dogs weaved in and out of the circle we formed. There was nuzzling. There was slurping of water in the catch-basins at the bottom of the planters. There was sniffing of, well, pretty much everything around us. And there was the occasional period of heavy barking and mad-dashing around the house every time the radiator made an odd noise or one of them saw a squirrel or deer through the window.

But here’s the strange thing. Particularly on Sunday, our second morning, we agreed that we’d had a really good sit. We were doing the Mindfulness of Breathing, and typically it’s quite a challenge to keep my mind focused on the breath for very long. But not so on Sunday. I had what seemed like long stretches of strong focus and concentration, with very little distraction or wandering. And I wasn’t alone in experiencing that, despite the bouts of doggy bedlam going on around us.

I wonder if it was the degree to which one distraction completely overwhelmed every other potential distraction. The dog noises were so front-and-center that all of the other needling distractions that I usually face didn’t stand a chance of gaining prominence. And at the same time, I was completely relaxed about the dog noises. If it had just been Mona I probably would have been mortified. But it was Mona, Dante, and Inu, all dogs being dogs and doing what dogs do. We also all took a rather light-hearted approach to the whole situation. There was just no way to take the tableau seriously. There we were, sitting in a circle around an improvised shrine, chanting the Refuges and Precepts in Pali as the dogs wandered in and out, wagging their tails, nuzzling us, wondering what on earth it was we were doing.

I don’t think I’ll be adding the Mindfulness of Dog to my regular meditation routine. But as they often are, these dogs were good teachers. They seemed to say: Relax, and enjoy the situation. There’s nothing you can do to change our nature, so just be with it and see what happens.